In 2016 the human race spends 1000 times more money and time on Learning Commns Tech. We invite you to vote for the the most productive Youth Economies (more) linking in 3 billion new jobs that were impossible to co-create in times when distance caused communications to be expensive and the idea of an app being mobilised any time any place by anyone sounded like science fiction. see also microfranchise & health as pivotal youth economy

Let's begin with the most exciting girls empowerment economy: its human epicentre is Sir Fazle Abed in Bangladesh of the world's largest and most collaborative NGO known by hundreds of partners and millions whose education calling is girls empowerment as pre-digital BRAC and post-digital BKASH -currently the world's largest cashless economy co-created by and for girls faced with poverty's and sustainability most extreme challenges. Starting the search for how to value this youth economy was to be the last project of The Economist's Norman Macrae whose work (more) on the Entrepreneurial Revolution of millennials 3 billion new jobs began with this (Keynsian inspired - more) future history in 1972. RSVP isabella@unacknowledgedgiant.com or to start linking in text Norman's family in wsshington DC at USA 240 316 8157
next education open space new york 1 to 12 march 2016 - previous MIT 25 to 29 january - queries on linking in - chris.macrae@yahoo.co.uk or text usa 240 316 8157 Freeing 3rd grade teachers to ask parents & communities: do you live in a sustainable economy?

Thursday, February 11, 2016

how did west end up teaching non-integral models of development

Do you see the CITE lab at MIT as connected with jobenomics and integral purpose of green tv. I too am bothered by students experimenting with hundreds of separated solar projects not how the whole needs to scale


ardoso moved to the U.N. headquarters in Rome, where he was privy to the high-level funding decisions that eventually trickle down to the local level. The experience, along with a chance meeting with the late MIT professor Alice Amsden, who taught a class he was taking, motivated Cardoso to apply to a PhD program at MIT.
“In theory you have all these projects, all these amazing things that are supposed to happen, but they don't, the execution doesn't work out,” says Cardoso. “And I was like, I have to understand that pattern.”
Combining theory and practice
At MIT, Cardoso has embraced the opportunity to combine theory and practice, while also working to understand the growing role of technology in communities worldwide. Cardoso, who works with Bish Sanyal, the Ford International Professor of Urban Development and Planning, has mainly been involved in a project called the Comprehensive Initiative on Technology Evaluation, or CITE.
“The idea is one simple technology can have this huge impact on someone's well-being,” explains Cardoso. “But today there are a lot of technologies out there such as solar lanterns or water filters, and there's no way to systematically evaluate what works and what doesn't work on the ground.”
With CITE, Cardoso and the project’s other team members are working to develop an objective methodology to assess the usefulness of various technologies. To assess a product, CITE focuses on three main categories: suitability (does the technology work properly?), scalability (can the technology actually reach the consumers?), and sustainability (will the technology create a long-lasting impact, and will the business model supporting it survive long-term?). For the past five years, Cardoso and the rest of the CITE team have been organizing pilot studies all over the world, from solar lanterns in Uganda to water filters in India, and now they are in the process of compiling their results and developing the best methodology.

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